?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Ryltar's Glitch Zone
Bug Reports
Recent Entries 
Mad Scientist
Loki's Chitauri Scepter from The Avengers (2012)

This a replica of the short staff Loki used to mind control Hawkeye and several others, and escape from the SHIELD compound. This item is approximately 96 cm long (36 in).

Notice: This device will not grant you the ability to fire energy blasts or take over the minds of your enemies. Such upgrades are welcome as derivatives.




Print
Assemble (not the heroes)
???
Take over the world

Printing

I printed the staff with ABS, 2 shells, 0.2 layer height, and 10% infill. Some pieces do require support. Included is the staff sliced to fit a Makerbot Replicator in .stl files (may not be oriented for minimal support). If you need to slice it differently, I've also included the .skp file with the original designs in it. All names referenced below should match the .stl file names.


Note: Pieces have small holes for short segments of ~1.7mm filament. These are used for test fitting and alignment for gluing.

If you do not own a 3d printer, the design files should allow you to make your own scepter out of wood or other carvable material. Much of the process after cutting out the segments will be the same.




Download files from Thingiverse

Additional Materials


1.5 Meters Wire, ~18ga
9v Battery
9v Battery Harness
LEDs

Number and type are your choice
I recommend using a mix of 80%/20% white to blue.

Resistors

these should be selected to allow your LED compliment to work with a 9v battery.

Sub-mini toggle switch

1/4" hole size
The switch slot is about 3/8" x 1/4" x 9/16" include space for wiring.

Appliance Light Bulb
Blue Ant Farm Gel
Clear Resin
Clear silicon caulk (Optional)
Plastic friendly paints and primers

Bronze or antique gold for the staff
Steel for the blades
Metallic black for the flats of the blades

Rare Earth Magnets (Optional)

1/16in thick by 1/4in diameter
Amazon: 30 Neodymium Magnets 1/4 x 1/16 inch Disc


Assembly

Once printing is complete, remove all support and sand pieces smooth.



Freshly printed part. If I was a little smarter, I would have arranged the part to print with less support.





Parts sanded and being test fitted

After pieces are prepared, glue mirrored pieces together except for the haft base and haft-covers. These are the end pieces on the left of the above image.

Attach the wire to the switch, at least enough to reach from the switch compartment to the gem location and still have enough slack to work with. Insert the switch into the half base (see below) and run the wire through the rest of the half.






The switch goes in the little compartment on the right. Excess wire goes in the space to the left.


Glue the haft segments together into one piece, mirrored pieces first. Glue one of the haft-cover pieces to the haft. Leave the other free; this piece will be your battery cover.



Scepter haft test fitting


More testing fitting





Components being glued together.





Sections clamped together; epoxy drying.





Major assembly completed. Filled in gaps between parts. Final smoothing and filling .

When painting, make sure you use a plastic safe and friendly paint. Make sure you pay attention to what materials the paint is for; using the wrong paint means it will never fully dry. Otherwise it will not adhere well or dry fully. Allow stated dry times for each layer.





Parts hung by fishing line for priming and painting.


Making the Gem

The gem is an appliance light bulb. I used a diamond Dremel blade slice off the metal base. The bulb was then coated inside and out with a few layers of clear resin to prevent shattering.



The blue insides were made from the translucent blue ant farm gel. I prepared a batch and let it fully dry. After it was dry, I shredded it into chunks and let those dry. These chunks were then used to fill the bulb.



The last stage is to wire the LEDs up and insert them into the bulb. If you know your electronics basics but are unsure how to figure out the LED and resistor relations for a 9v system, use http://ledcalculator.net/. If you don't know your electronics basics, get a friend to help. This is a pretty basic circuit but there are a lot of variables as to what one can do here so I leave it to you.

Attach the length of wires to the LED circuits but not to the 9v holder or the switch yet. That is for after final assembly.

Additionally you should seal the wire connections near the bulb to prevent any moisture from shorting out the circuit. I didn't on my first setup and the LEDs were fried by the end of the day. One my second, I used clear silicon caulk to seal all the LEDs and associated wires into a single mass.



Ant gel drying. Ignore the glitter, it was an attempt that failed.





'Gem' with 100% white LEDs. Mixing in blue LEDs to get 20% blue make the colour much better.


Final Assembly



Glue the small blade pieces to the main haft.
Run the gem wire through the codpiece and glue the gem to the codpiece.
Glue the neck pieces together and to the haft. See the model for how these pieces are named and arranged.

Neck piece 3 goes into piece 2
Both those go inside piece 1a
Piece 1b goes outside of 1a
These should fit together easily
Piece 1 has pillars which fit into the haft and have keyholes in neck piece 2 and 3.

Run the gem wires down the center of the haft. Using 18ga wire did not result in any problems.

Don't pull too hard on the wires, otherwise you may dislodge your LEDs.

Glue the codpiece to the rest of the assembly. The gem should be resting on the back of the short blade.
Glue the large blade to the scepter. This will slide into neck piece 3.
Glue the jewel holder (remaining two flat and small pieces) to large and small blades. This should sit just above and around the gem.

These pieces may need to be heated and curved depending on your setup.

Make the final wiring connections

Trim the wires to length. Excess wire will make fitting the battery into the compartment difficult.
Connect the positive line from the LEDs a line coming from the switch.
Connect the negative line from the LEDs to the battery holder.
Connect the positive line from the battery holder to the other switch wire.

(OPTIONAL) Glue the magnets into the haft base and the haft base cover. These will be a tight fit.

Make sure the magnets line up for polarity. Otherwise the cover will not want to sit.

Enjoy being burdened with a glorious prop.





Individually painted sections being glued together.





Epoxied gem in place


Completed Scepter




Completed and painted scepter.





ENOUGH! You are, all of you are beneath me!
I am a god, you dull creature, and I will not be bullied by...


Do not allow Deadpool near your scepter. Silliness will occur...



If you have any questions or comments about this, feel free to comment here or at
Mad Scientist
A few years ago, I was comissioned to make a flower basket with glowing materia for an Aerith Gainsborough cosplay. Aerith also requested that the basket be able to hold something other than flowers.




Flower Basket with glowing Materia
(Two magic, a summon, and a support materia equipped)

It started with a basket from Michaels. Then I cut an oval out of 1/4 ply to fit in the top rim; this was also cut in half. I also added a rectangular piece across where the handle joins to basket act as a central support. Small hinges joined these pieces together. This gave me a surface to attach the flowers and materia to. This surface was spray painted a grassy green to match the flower stems.

The materia started life as clear, Christmas decoration orbs. I coated the inside with a layer or two of glass frosting spray paint. This gave the orbs a good foggy look. I also stuffed the orbs loosely with pillow stuffing fiber to further diffuse any light sources. The lights were culled from a string of Christmas lights. Three lights of each color went into the orbs. These were wired together in a series circuit. All of the orbs were then wired to a 9v battery (in parallel). Looking back, I would use LEDs instead of standard filament Christmas lights for longer life, less power consumed, and less heat generated.

The flowers were fake flowers, also from Michaels. These and the materia were layered onto the basket and attached with hot glue to hold them in place. The layering began at the outside and moved towards the center to make sure the stems and the wires were all properly hidden. The connection for the 9v battery was inside the basket, easily connected or disconnected as needed.

The end result worked out well and looked pretty good. There are several changes I would make if I were to do it again, but I'm happy with the result at the time.
Mad Scientist
So the main website, GlitchTechScience.com, has been down for a while now. I finally added forwarding to this blog as I haven't decided if I want to keep the site alive or not. I'm evaluating the pros and cons of having a dedicated server while I continue to develop my mobile applications and play with my robotics.
17th-Jan-2013 10:13 am - [Glitch Tech] 1/17/2013 10:13:00 AM
Mad Scientist
Recently I had to deal with data loss from a postgresql database. So, after painfully recreating the data and schema it was time to setup a cron job to prevent this happening again. The following script should prevent that in the future (thanks to http://www.nzlinux.com/2010/06/daily-postgresql-backups-script/).

#!/bin/bash
DIR=/backup/pgsql

#Database backup
LIST=$(su - postgres -c "/usr/bin/psql -lt" |/usr/bin/awk '{ print $1}' |/bin/grep -vE '^-|:|^\||^List|^Name|template[0|1]')

#Set current date for backups
DATE=$(/bin/date '+%Y%m%d');

#Remove old backups
rm -rf $DIR/

#Create and own backup
/bin/mkdir -p $DIR/$DATE/
/bin/chown postgres:postgres $DIR/$DATE/

#Cycle databases, get backup, save
for d in $LIST
do
su - postgres -c "/usr/bin/pg_dump $d | gzip -c > $DIR/$DATE/$d.sql.gz"
done
5th-Mar-2012 10:54 am - [Glitch Tech] Checkbook HD v1.0.7
Mad Scientist
Checkbook HD is now at v1.0.7. This is the first time I have felt comfortable enough with the app to give it the version of at least 1.

In version 1.0.7, there are three new systems: Budgeting, Searching, and Split Transactions. These systems are what they sound like. The budget system allows one to create and track spending based on categories. Searching allows one to search by text strings, date ranges, accounts, transaction status, etc. Split transactions allows one to assign multiple categories to a single transaction.

Also in v1.0.7 is a fix to a major issue that has been plaguing Checkbook since the webOS update to 3.0.5. The fix should take care of the majority of the long loading issues. I've also implemented a fix into the Import/Export systems that should take care of some issues they were having.
19th-Feb-2012 11:15 am - [Glitch Tech] MakerBot Replicator
Mad Scientist
Just bought a MakerbBot Replicator. I am very excited to say the least. Odds are I'm going to burn though the initially provided 2kg of abs plastic with a week or two of arrival. It'll be pretty fun (and frustrating I'm sure) to build new parts for my robotics work and costume bits. I know one of the first costume parts I'm building is going to be for Mass Effect 3 costumes, the M-5 Phalanx. More to come when the 3d printer arrives.
25th-Jan-2012 03:20 pm - [Glitch Tech] 1/25/2012 03:20:00 PM
Mad Scientist
Today HP released Enyo as open source. They also announced Enyo 2, which will increase its cross platform & browser compatibility (along with many more great changes). That makes today a great day. With this release, I can code once and deploy a web app to webOS, Android, iOS, and other WebKit enabled browsers with ease.

With Enyo 2, I'll be able to write it once and deploy it on all those systems and on any web browser with modern web runtime. Enyo 2 currently does not have UI elements built in but that is planned for a March 2012. With that release, it'll be fun to see what I can convert at work to use this new and awesome framework.

I'm not the best at reporting all that is going on, so I direct you to enyojs.com. That is where the framework now exists (and on github, that is linked from the enyojs homepage).
9th-Dec-2011 01:08 pm - [Glitch Tech] 12/09/2011 01:02:00 PM
Mad Scientist
So webOS, my favorite mobile os, is becoming open source. Good. I am eager (and slightly fearful) of what is to come now.


The bad is all the unknowns of a big company open sourcing a product they don't seem to care for at times. Will HP only opensource it and then forget it or will the entire ecosystem flourish under this license? Will the software die without a dedicated hardware platform?


The good news is it'll be easier for me to write my apps for multiple OSes and for the web in general. So eventually Checkbook (and whatever other apps I decide to build/open up) will be available in all sorts of places and on many operating systems.


http://www.precentral.net/hp-open-source-webos-no-hardware-plans-or-partners-announced
http://www.precentral.net/open-source-plan
8th-Jul-2011 12:05 pm - [Glitch Tech] Testing
Mad Scientist
Testing integration into a new system.
9th-Jun-2011 11:34 pm - [Glitch Tech] Website Redesign
Mad Scientist
I recently redesigned the GlitchTech Science website. While I did not
add much design related content, I did several chunks of code behind
the website. The site now uses jQuery UI in several areas. The most
visible items are the left side navigation (I still need to tweak it
more) and the home page blog view.

I'm not fully happy with the navigation system on the site yet. It is
function though, and I do like it better than the previous system. For
those who didn't see it, the previous system was a top bar with
mouse-over drop downs. It was easy to move your mouse outside of the
drop down element and loose the stack. Not the best way to do things.
Now the sidebar relies on mouse clicks on the arrows. Clicking one
opens a section. Clicking the title of the section has inconsistent
behavior. If it is a link, it will take you to that webpage. If it
isn't, it doesn't do anything. In a future revision I need to make it a
more consistent interaction. I'd also like to make it so a section will
open up if it contains a link to the current page.

The blog view uses the RSS feed from the blogger account to render the
content. It uses MagpieRSS to parse the XML content. The content is
then formatted and placed in a jQuery UI Accordion system. This allows
me to have three of the most recent posts rendered with all the content
present and then have a list of links to past posts in a fourth divider.

Besides those visible changes, I also changed a few areas of the PHP
code running things. I'm most happy with my changes to the navigation
code. Before it was a jumble of links manually typed out. Now it is a
recursive list generator based on the array passed in. The array can be
nested as deep as needed, too deep of a nesting makes for a horrible
list to navigate. If you are interested in the code, it is beyond the
jump.

echo "
    \n" . buildNavigation( $headerLinks ) . "
\n";
function buildNavigation( $arrayIn ) {
$naviOut = "";
foreach( $arrayIn as $key => $value ) {
$count = 0;
$external = "";
$key = str_replace( "[ext]", "", $key, $count );
if( $count > 0 ) {
$external = " onclick='return( popUp( this.href ) );'";
}
if( is_array( $value ) ) {
if( array_key_exists( '_LINK_', $value ) ) {
$naviOut .= "
  • [Error: Irreparable invalid markup ('<a [...] ">') in entry. Owner must fix manually. Raw contents below.]

    I recently redesigned the GlitchTech Science website. While I did not
    add much design related content, I did several chunks of code behind
    the website. The site now uses jQuery UI in several areas. The most
    visible items are the left side navigation (I still need to tweak it
    more) and the home page blog view.

    I'm not fully happy with the navigation system on the site yet. It is
    function though, and I do like it better than the previous system. For
    those who didn't see it, the previous system was a top bar with
    mouse-over drop downs. It was easy to move your mouse outside of the
    drop down element and loose the stack. Not the best way to do things.
    Now the sidebar relies on mouse clicks on the arrows. Clicking one
    opens a section. Clicking the title of the section has inconsistent
    behavior. If it is a link, it will take you to that webpage. If it
    isn't, it doesn't do anything. In a future revision I need to make it a
    more consistent interaction. I'd also like to make it so a section will
    open up if it contains a link to the current page.

    The blog view uses the RSS feed from the blogger account to render the
    content. It uses MagpieRSS to parse the XML content. The content is
    then formatted and placed in a jQuery UI Accordion system. This allows
    me to have three of the most recent posts rendered with all the content
    present and then have a list of links to past posts in a fourth divider.

    Besides those visible changes, I also changed a few areas of the PHP
    code running things. I'm most happy with my changes to the navigation
    code. Before it was a jumble of links manually typed out. Now it is a
    recursive list generator based on the array passed in. The array can be
    nested as deep as needed, too deep of a nesting makes for a horrible
    list to navigate. If you are interested in the code, it is beyond the
    jump.

    echo "<ul id='nav'>\n" . buildNavigation( $headerLinks ) . "</ul>\n";
    function buildNavigation( $arrayIn ) {
    $naviOut = "";
    foreach( $arrayIn as $key => $value ) {
    $count = 0;
    $external = "";
    $key = str_replace( "[ext]", "", $key, $count );
    if( $count > 0 ) {
    $external = " onclick='return( popUp( this.href ) );'";
    }
    if( is_array( $value ) ) {
    if( array_key_exists( '_LINK_', $value ) ) {
    $naviOut .= "<li><a href='" . $value['_LINK_'] . "'" .
    $external . ">" . $key . "</a>";
    unset( $value['_LINK_'] );
    } else {
    $naviOut .= "<li>" . $key;
    }
    $naviOut .= "\n<ul>\n";
    $naviOut .= buildNavigation( $value );
    $naviOut .= "</ul>\n";
    $naviOut .= "</li>\n";
    } else {
    $naviOut .= "<li><a href='" . $value . "'" . $external . ">" .
    $key . "</a></li>\n";
    }
    }
    return $naviOut;
    }
  • This page was loaded Jul 16th 2018, 6:21 am GMT.